CPLC Parenting Arizona regularly shares positive parenting tips that help parents daily with their children through our social media. We regularly will update new tips that will help Arizona’s families.

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School Readiness

Do you want your child to develop good reading habits?

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  • As parents, we serve as role models for our children. Boost early literacy by reading to your child for fun.
  • Having conversations with your child will help with early literacy.
  • Have your child pick out books to improve early literacy.
  • Go over numbers, letters, words and pictures with your child to improve early literacy.
  • Increase vocabulary by using expressive words with your child, instead of very mad use furious.
  • Reading to your child will increase phonological awareness.
  • Be careful when playing scary movies with children; they will have nightmares or anxiety.
  • Be cautious of what children watch on TV. Children from 2 to 7 will not be able to distinguish between fantasy and reality.
  • You can improve brain development with your child by playing, singing and reading!

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Positive Discipline

How to prevent temper tantrums.

[reveal title=”Click here for more positive discipline tips:” open=”false” color=”black”]Give your child descriptive praise when they do something that you want to see more often.

Connect through conflict, view conflict as an opportunity to teach your kids essential relationship skills, like seeing other people’s perspectives, reading non-verbal cues and making amends.

As a general rule, try to give children five times more praise than criticism.

Rules should be simple and clear.

Tell your child what you want them to do, not what you don’t want them to do.

Sometimes changing your tone or volume can be enough to get your child to do what you need them to do.

Encourage your child to talk to you—sit beside them—they’ll find it easier to talk if you’re not standing over them.

Quality time ensures positive discipline is effective![/reveal]

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Family Bonding

As parents, we serve as role models for our children…

[reveal title=”Click for a few more family bonding parenting tips that can help you and your family: ” open=”false” color=”black”]Create routines with your family. Help them learn it’s time for sleep by doing the same things in order each night such as bath, books, feeding, teeth and a lullaby.

Enjoy each other: Build fun into the family, so that your kids enjoy positive and satisfying experiences with the people they’re with the most.

Find small moments of togetherness with your family to help create a low-stress household.

Daily routines are key to ensure a stress-free home. Start today by starting a morning and bedtime ritual!

Break up your routine. Go somewhere fun, such as an amusement park, a zoo, a museum, an apple orchard, or a water park. Ask your kids for ideas of where they think it would be fun to go.

Create a list of chore that includes all members of the household to support responsibility, togetherness, and work ethic.

If you are traveling with your kids this summer, snacks, art projects, and audiobooks are great activities for the road.

Keep a consistent bedtime and soothing routine for getting to bed. Turn off the TV, videogames and computer at least 30 minutes before bedtime. Praise your child for staying in bed.

Providing children with everything they want is not the job of parents.[/reveal]

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Social Interaction

Always talk to your child about the happy experiences to expect in the new situation. Help your child look forward to a favorite activity or person.

[reveal title=”Click here for just a few more social interaction parenting tips for you and your child: ” open=”false” color=”black”]Prepare your child for a new separation. Prior to the first day, make a short visit and include a tour of the facility.

Show your child where their belongings will go, bathrooms, nap area, etc.

When you are leaving your child for some reason be aware of your own separation anxiety. Don’t prolong the goodbye. If you are concerned throughout the day call your caregiver usually all is well after a short departure.

Help your child choose a part of home to bring with them to a new place. Often a blanket, snuggly toy or familiar photograph extends the security of home to an unfamiliar setting. A “blankie” is a tactile comfort that smells, feels and looks like home.

Watch for your child’s individual expressions of anxiety- wetting pants, thumb sucking, or other behavior changes.

Patience and understanding from parents and caregivers will help your child cope with his feelings.

Reading stories about separation experiences can help prepare your child for a new situation and the feelings he may have.

Acknowledge their feelings and teach social skills at the same time. “I know the doll stroller is your favorite toy, but Thomas would like a turn pushing it.”

Use pretend play to help your child handle challenging situations. You might act out a story together about meeting a new babysitter. : Let your child lead the play. Ask: Who should I be? What will happen next?

Give your child regular chances to play with children her age. This builds social skills.

Help your child with conflicts around sharing and turn-taking. Let her know you understand that sharing is hard. Help her find another toy to play with until it’s her turn. Use a kitchen time to help her learn to wait.

Encourage children to problem solve. “You both want the tricycle. What can we do about this?”

Help children understand others’ feelings. “Janelle is covering her face. She doesn’t like it when you throw the ball so hard. Let’s roll it gently instead.”

Always talk to your child about the happy experiences to expect in the new situation. Help your child look forward to a favorite activity or person.

Prepare your child for a new separation. Prior to the first day, make a short visit and include a tour of the facility.

Show your child where their belongings will go, bathrooms, nap area, etc.

When you are leaving your child for some reason be aware of your own separation anxiety. Don’t prolong the goodbye. If you are concerned throughout the day call your caregiver usually all is well after a short departure.

Help your child choose a part of home to bring with them to a new place. Often a blanket, snuggly toy or familiar photograph extends the security of home to an unfamiliar setting. A “blankie” is a tactile comfort that smells, feels and looks like home.

Watch for your child’s individual expressions of anxiety – wetting pants, thumb sucking, or other behavior changes.

Patience and understanding from parents and caregivers will help your child cope with his feelings.

Reading stories about separation experiences can help prepare your child for a new situation and the feelings he may have.

Acknowledge their feelings and teach social skills at the same time. “I know the doll stroller is your favorite toy, but Thomas would like a turn pushing it.”

Use pretend play to help your child handle challenging situations. You might act out a story together about meeting a new babysitter. : Let your child lead the play. Ask: Who should I be? What will happen next?

Give your child regular chances to play with children her age. This builds social skills.

Help your child with conflicts around sharing and turn-taking. Let her know you understand that sharing is hard. Help her find another toy to play with until it’s her turn. Use a kitchen time to help her learn to wait.

Encourage children to problem solve. “You both want the tricycle. What can we do about this?”

Help children understand others’ feelings. “Janelle is covering her face. She doesn’t like it when you throw the ball so hard. Let’s roll it gently instead.”

A child who is held and nurtured in a time of stress is less likely to respond with violence later.[/reveal]

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Child Activities

Help your child practice sorting. Ask your child to help you sort the laundry by putting socks in one pile and shirts in another.

[reveal title=”Click for a few more child activity tips that can be helpful to you and your children:” open=”false” color=”black”]Have your children play games that use problem-solving skills such as puzzles or building blocks.

Try putting your child in front of you rather than in your lap when reading. This way your baby can focus on your face as well as the book. You child will soon make the connection that you are reading from the book.

Introduce your baby to basic concepts of reading a book. Show your baby how to open the book to the first page.

Model how you turn the pages. Say “turn the page” every time you do. Then say “all done” soon they’ll know how to themselves.

Offer your child two choices on which book to read.

If your young child wants to read a book over and over again, that’s good. Use that as an opportunity to teach other concepts in the book, sounds, word recognition, etc.

Preparing for holidays is an excellent way for your child to learn family traditions. Read a book about the holiday, show your child the day on the calendar, have the child help you with the special food for the holiday.

Playing simple games during reading can help engage your child in the learning experience.  For example, “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes” you are reviewing body parts, and teaching them to listen carefully and follow directions.

Read counting books together. Have them trace the numbers in the book or anywhere with their index finger. Once they’re comfortable with counting, encourage them to count objects in your home and ones that you see while driving in the car too.

Give your child a visual aid to make waiting easier. If your child has to wait until the oatmeal is cooled down, show him the steam rising from the bowl. Tell him when the steam goes away, you can test the oatmeal on a spoon to see if it is cool enough. If you need to help your child brush her teeth for 2 mins each day, use an egg timer so she can watch the countdown. Need 10 mins to fold some clothes? Set a kitchen timer so that your child can keep track.[/reveal]

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Communication

Be clear about what’s really funny and what’s not. As kids develop a sense of humor, they’ll push the boundaries. Be clear about what’s inappropriate and why.

[reveal title=”Click here for a few more communication tips that can help you and your children:” open=”false” color=”black”]Set clear boundaries about what’s appropriate and what’s not. Some kids discover swearing will get others to laugh.

Some will talk about their private parts. Be clear what isn’t funny and what’s inappropriate.

The relationship you have with your child forms their sense of identity, self-worth, and competency. Invest time into building healthy relationships with your children.

Help your child learn patience by letting others go first or by finishing a task before going out to play.

People with high self-worth generally treat themselves, other, and the environment with respect. Encourage your children and help them to have high self-worth.

Children will not respect you if you do not respect them. The only way to get respect is to give it.

Avoid comparing siblings to one another. Acknowledge that your children are individuals.

Refrain from making negative comments about the other parents in the presence of a child.

Give your child positive, focused attention.

Read with your child every day. Reading with your child everyday is a great way to spend one on one time with your child.

Take everyday moments like riding in the car to talk with your child. It can help keep the lines of communication open.[/reveal]

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Child Health

Helpful and fun ways to get your baby to sleep.

[reveal title=”Click here for some effective child health tips that can help you and your child:” open=”false” color=”black”]Take your child to the pediatrician regularly for wellness checkups.

When trying to get your kids to eat healthier, encourage them to come up with tasty and healthy snacks and meals. This will give them the opportunity to problem solve.

Children can develop healthier eating habits by learning to prepare meals with real ingredients, instead of learning to zap something in the microwave.

Cooking with kids gives parents the opportunity to meet two important needs: preparing a meal for the family and spending quality time with their kids.

Young children think that immersing food in a tasty dip is pure fun. Try dipping snacks in peanut butter, yogurt, fruit juice, etc.

How much a child will eat often depends on how you cut it. Cut sandwiches, pancakes, waffles, and pizza into various shapes using cookie cutters.

If your child is going through a picky-eater stage, invite over a friend who is the same age or slightly older whom you know “likes to eat.” Your child will catch on. Group feeding lets the other kids set the example.

Children should be offered three to five servings of veggies a day.

Children are more likely to eat their own creations, so, when appropriate, let your child help prepare the food.[/reveal]